• This is default featured slide 1 title

    Go to Blogger edit html and find these sentences.Now replace these sentences with your own descriptions.This theme is Bloggerized by Lasantha Bandara - Premiumbloggertemplates.com.

  • This is default featured slide 2 title

    Go to Blogger edit html and find these sentences.Now replace these sentences with your own descriptions.This theme is Bloggerized by Lasantha Bandara - Premiumbloggertemplates.com.

  • This is default featured slide 3 title

    Go to Blogger edit html and find these sentences.Now replace these sentences with your own descriptions.This theme is Bloggerized by Lasantha Bandara - Premiumbloggertemplates.com.

  • This is default featured slide 4 title

    Go to Blogger edit html and find these sentences.Now replace these sentences with your own descriptions.This theme is Bloggerized by Lasantha Bandara - Premiumbloggertemplates.com.

  • This is default featured slide 5 title

    Go to Blogger edit html and find these sentences.Now replace these sentences with your own descriptions.This theme is Bloggerized by Lasantha Bandara - Premiumbloggertemplates.com.

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Is there a link between iron deficiency and hearing loss?



Your body needs the right nutrients in the right amounts to support its overall function and to ensure that everything is working as it should.

But is it possible that the deficiency of one important nutrient can put you at risk for hearing loss? According to researchers, iron deficiency and anaemia during childhood may affect your hearing later in life.

The study was conducted at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and published in JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, and followed 305 339 adults between the ages of 21 and 90.

The results of the study showed that those who suffered from anaemia as a result of iron deficiency (IDA) were twice as likely to have hearing loss later in life than those with sufficient amounts of iron.

“An association exists between IDA and hearing loss,” wrote the authors of the study. “The next steps are to better understand this correlation and whether promptly diagnosing and treating IDA may positively affect the overall health status of adults with hearing loss."

Earlier research

Decades ago, a study conducted with rats showed the same outcome. This study showed that there might be a link between sudden sensorineural hearing loss and iron deficiency.

This study showed a significant result in the loss of spiral ganglion cells, abnormalities of the cochlea and changes in the hair cells of the ears when the rats were not fed enough iron.

What is the link?

What exactly is it that links this decline in hearing function to iron deficiency anaemia? According to specialists, while the studies prove that the right nutrients are needed to maintain proper hearing function, they don't provide positive proof that iron deficiency anaemia causes hearing loss (there is only a connection).

Ear-nose-and-throat specialist Peter Steyger of Oregon Health & Science University’s Oregon Hearing Research Centre, maintains there are several aspects that could link iron deficiency and hearing loss.

"Iron is clearly required for normal functioning of the auditory system, as for many other organs, and too little can result in anaemia, the loss of haemoglobin in red blood cells which carry oxygen to the tissues in the body. Too little iron can also disrupt the workings of cells and even kill them, leading to hearing loss if that happens to hair cells in the inner ear”, he said.
Share:

Do women hear better than men?



Most of us probably take what we can hear for granted – from the drone of traffic in the distance to the crying baby next door.

Our ears do an incredible job of translating the sounds around us into information that our brains can understand. It's as automatic as breathing and happens without us really giving the process much thought.

Read: How do we hear?

But sometimes loud noise can be damaging to our ears. We take a look at how noise can affect your hearing.
Share:

How does the body respond to touching something hot?


It’s happened to all of us – reaching for a plate only to make the unfortunate discovery that it’s scalding hot and in danger of giving your hand a nasty sizzle, so, quick as a flash, you drop it.
This might seem like a rather uninteresting sequence of events, but in fact it’s a rare exception to the way your body normally functions – an exception that is probably one of the reasons why humans are still around.
The human nervous system can be divided into two parts: the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The central nervous system is made up of the spinal cord and the brain, while the peripheral nervous system is everything else, right down to the pain sensors in your big toe. These two systems work together to basically control  everything you do.
Share:

Mediterranean diet may help preserve your vision



A Mediterranean-style diet might significantly reduce your risk of a major cause of blindness, a new study suggests.

Poor diet is emerging as an important factor in the development of a degenerative eye disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It's a leading cause of vision loss among older Americans.

"You are what you eat," said Dr Emily Chew, spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and an adviser to the research group that conducted the study.

"Chronic diseases, such as AMD, dementia, obesity and diabetes, all have roots in poor dietary habits. It's time to take quitting a poor diet as seriously as quitting smoking," Chew said in an academy news release.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from nearly 5 000 people, aged 55 and older, in the Netherlands. Those who closely followed a Mediterranean diet were 41% less likely to develop late-stage AMD than those who did not follow the diet.

A Mediterranean diet favors vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, olive oil and fish over meat. The study found that, on their own, none of those individual components reduced the risk of late-stage AMD. Rather, it was the overall diet that significantly reduced the risk.

However, the study cannot prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship.

AMD causes loss of central vision, which is crucial in everyday activities such as driving, reading and writing. It affects 1.8 million Americans, and that number is expected to rise to nearly 3 million by 2020, the researchers said.

The study findings were published online recently in the journal Ophthalmology.
Share:

Colds especially bad? It may be the bacteria in your nose


For people suffering from a cold, the severity of their symptoms may be linked to the mix of bacteria that inhabit their nose.

New research suggests the amount and type of organisms residing in the nose might explain why some people's symptoms are worse than others – even if they are infected with the same strain of virus.

Six different patterns

For the study, researchers analysed the nasal bacteria of 152 people before and after they were infected with the same cold virus. People whose noses have a lot of Staphylococcus bacteria had more severe nasal symptoms than those with less of this type of bacteria.

The findings were published recently in the journal Scientific Reports.

The bacteria inside the noses of the participants followed one of six different patterns, which were associated with variations in the severity of their symptoms. The mix of nasal bacteria was also linked with their viral load, or the amount of the virus in their body.

"There were effects on virus load and how much virus you shed in your nasal secretions. So the background microbiome, the background bacterial pattern in your nose, had influences on the way that you reacted to the virus and how sick you got," said researcher Dr Ronald Turner, who's with the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

But the researchers added that their findings don't prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

Treatment with probiotics

"What we're reporting is an association, so it's entirely possible that the fact that you have staph in your nose and you have more symptoms is not directly related," Turner explained in a university news release. "It may well be that there's some underlying host characteristic that makes you likely to have staph in your nose and also makes you more likely to become ill."

The researchers noted that the composition of nasal bacteria and the severity of people's symptoms could boil down to genetics.
Share:

45 best health tips ever



We've done the legwork for you and here they are: the 45 best health tips. Make that 46 - taking the time to read this tops the list.

1. Copy your kitty: Learn to do stretching exercises when you wake up. It boosts circulation and digestion, and eases back pain.

2. Don’t skip breakfast. Studies show that eating a proper breakfast is one of the most positive things you can do if you are trying to lose weight. Breakfast skippers tend to gain weight. A balanced breakfast includes fresh fruit or fruit juice, a high-fibre breakfast cereal, low-fat milk or yoghurt, wholewheat toast, and a boiled egg.

3. Brush up on hygiene. Many people don't know how to brush their teeth properly. Improper brushing can cause as much damage to the teeth and gums as not brushing at all. Lots of people don’t brush for long enough, don’t floss and don’t see a dentist regularly. Hold your toothbrush in the same way that would hold a pencil, and brush for at least two minutes.

This includes brushing the teeth, the junction of the teeth and gums, the tongue and the roof of the mouth. And you don't need a fancy, angled toothbrush – just a sturdy, soft-bristled one that you replace each month.

4. Neurobics for your mind. Get your brain fizzing with energy. American researchers coined the term ‘neurobics’ for tasks which activate the brain's own biochemical pathways and to bring new pathways online that can help to strengthen or preserve brain circuits.

Brush your teeth with your ‘other’ hand, take a new route to work or choose your clothes based on sense of touch rather than sight. People with mental agility tend to have lower rates of Alzheimer's disease and age-related mental decline.

5. Get what you give! Always giving and never taking? This is the short road to compassion fatigue. Give to yourself and receive from others, otherwise you’ll get to a point where you have nothing left to give. And hey, if you can’t receive from others, how can you expect them to receive from you?
Share:

Search This Blog

Powered by Blogger.

Blog Archive

Is there a link between iron deficiency and hearing loss?

Your body needs the right nutrients in the right amounts to support its overall function and to ensure that everything is working as it ...

Recent Posts

Unordered List

Pages

Theme Support